An eye-opening case of elder abuse

There is a type of abuse you don’t hear about much but is one psychologists believe has persisted for generations.

We often hear of spousal abuse and sexual abuse, while bullying has been the most recent hot-button issue. But rarely, if ever, do people think about elder abuse. Until recently, I was one of those people.

There is a family that is close to me and has been telling me about their ordeal involving their patriarch.

Their story began last summer when the man, whom I’ll call Grandpa, suffered a stroke. His prospects didn’t look good for what seemed like the longest time until he finally took a turn for the better.

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Dickinson’s little world hinges on the big picture

A look at the neighboring Halliburton and Baker Hughes campuses in north Dickinson.

Last week brought word of numerous brand-name businesses planning to open in Dickinson.

Franchisees of Famous Dave’s barbecue restaurants are making plans to come here — though they aren’t sure where or when — and Five Diamond properties says Petco, JoAnn Fabrics and Dollar Tree are among the retailers planning to lease space in its new development planned for west Dickinson. The Roers West Ridge development has Menards and hotels that are sure to draw other big-box stores. Who knows? Maybe someone will even bring in Target for those of you who can’t stand Walmart.

I say this all the time because I believe it will be true: At the rate we’re going, there is going to be an entirely new part of Dickinson off Interstate 94’s Exit 59 in a couple of years.

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Downtown Dickinson revitalization a growing need

Downtown Dickinson is looking into a revitalization.

While in Bismarck on Saturday night, I decided it was time for Sarah and I to try something different and move our palettes beyond the growingly bland chain restaurants we have eaten at too many times.

When I started looking for a different place to eat and surprise her with, my first thought was to look up dining in downtown Bismarck. That’s when I came up with the Toasted Frog. I had heard a lot about it, but had never been there — much like many of the dining spots in our capital city’s downtown.

Before Saturday, I had never been in Bismarck’s downtown and thought, “Wow, what a cool atmosphere.” Despite rain, people were out and about and the place was vibrant. The Toasted Frog had great food, and the restaurant and its surrounding streets provided something we don’t have much of in Dickinson — a vibrant downtown atmosphere.

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Fall TV Preview

Every fall, a new TV season rolls around with an assortment of new choices and at least one show that you instantly fall in love with and almost as quickly gets canceled. Anyone remember “Lone Star”?
Well, here’s a list of possibly great, possibly horrible new shows you should at least try out this fall. But do it quick. Before they get the axe.

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ND farmers flying into D.C. to push for farm bill

Everyone has to eat.

That’s the motto southwest North Dakota farmers Jim Kerzman and Bob Kuylen have, and it’s the sentiment they’re taking with them to Washington, D.C., this week as part of the National Farmers Union’s annual fly-in event to lobby members of Congress to support the farm bill.

Sixty-seven North Dakota Farmers Union members are flying into the nation’s capital and Kuylan, who farms wheat and sunflowers near South Heart, said he hopes the delegation can put some faces to the farm bill.

“They like to talk to actual farmers instead of lobbyists,” Kuylen said. “We’ll tell them what’s going on out in the country, instead of someone being paid and curving it their way.”

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Tales of a typical North Dakota harvest

Combining south of New England.

Harvest in North Dakota can be a time of celebration, frustration and, if you get the crop in the bin or to the elevator, pure relief.

Once the crop is cut, there are no more worries about hail, thunderstorms or any other force of nature that can upset the fragile plants on which farmers’ livelihoods hinge. The stuff that makes the money is finally off the field and safely stored.

I spent eight of the last 12 days in August on what amounted to be a working vacation as I helped my dad and brother harvest their durum, spring wheat and canola crop. For those of you who don’t know my family or I, Monke Farms is located just west of the Enchanted Highway about 20 miles south of Gladstone and we farm land throughout northwestern Hettinger County.

Though my job here at The Press made me miss the start of harvest — my favorite part — I was able to experience more of it this year than I have since my first year of college.
Now any farmer will tell you that harvest doesn’t happen without hiccups. Ever.

This year wasn’t too bad though.

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