Artistic concentration: Fargo artist begins painting downtown mural

Fargo artist Paul Ide began painting a mural that will grace the west wall of the old Dickinson Press building on Saturday afternoon in downtown Dickinson.

Building owner Eric Smallwood said he found Ide after searching for the best mural artist in North Dakota.

He wanted to add color to downtown Dickinson and to get rid of the drab gray brick wall that he said needed to be repainted anyway.

For more photos, visit The Press website.

A generation stuck in transition

I was born in 1984. It was the year in which George Orwell set his classic dystopian novel of the same name. In reality, Big Brother didn’t come around until a few years later. (That’s another column for another time.)

Instead, the world got the “Ghostbusters,” George Michael and four more years of Ronald Reagan. Oh, and let’s not forget me and millions of other newborns.

Today, a little more than three decades later, the children of the early ’80s are an interesting bunch. Some of us are well into raising the next generation of Americans — the so-called “Boomlets” — while others are still raising hell.

In North Dakota, our age group — at least on the surface — is doing well. We are fortunate to be in an area where jobs are plentiful and pay well. Many of our peers throughout the country can’t say the same.

However, there’s one thing we should all be able to agree on: we are a generation without a classification.

Continue reading “A generation stuck in transition”

Dickinson couple loses 'everything they had' in late night fire

A couple embraces while looking at the remains of their rented trailer home early Saturday morning in south Dickinson. The couple lost two pets and most of their possessions in the fire, which happened directly behind the Paragon on Villard Street. (Dustin Monke / The Dickinson Press)
A couple embraces while looking at the remains of their rented trailer home early Saturday morning in south Dickinson. The couple lost two pets and most of their possessions in the fire, which happened directly behind the Paragon on Villard Street. (Dustin Monke / The Dickinson Press)

A young Dickinson couple is homeless after a late Friday night fire consumed the trailer home they were renting, as well as their two pets and most of their possessions.

“Absolutely everything they had, they lost right here,” Dickinson Fire Chief Bob Sivak said at the scene around 1:15 a.m. Saturday.

The couple, whose names were not provided, lost their Chihuahua dog and a cat in the fire. They were only able to salvage a handful of items left unaffected by the fire.

The trailer was only about 25 feet behind the Paragon bowling alley and sports club off Villard Street. The building was evacuated for a short time until the Dickinson Fire Department contained the blaze.

Sivak said the fire likely started in the front of the trailer, but that it’s difficult to determine the cause.

“There’s nothing to investigate. That’s how bad it is,” he said. “Wires are burned right down to the copper. The walls are down and everything. We could make a guess, but I don’t want to do that because I can’t prove that one way or another.”

Sivak said the couple did not have renter’s insurance, but that the American Red Cross was at the scene and was looking into ways to help them.

Remains of 'construction worker' found in north Dickinson

Investigators stand in an excavation site Friday on 40th Street in north Dickinson, where investigators are exhuming skeletal remains found late Thursday night. (Dustin Monke / The Dickinson Press)
Investigators stand in an excavation site Friday on 40th Street in north Dickinson, where investigators are exhuming skeletal remains found late Thursday night. (Dustin Monke / The Dickinson Press)

Law enforcement agencies spent much of Friday exhuming the decomposed human remains of an unidentified “apparent construction worker,” discovered late Thursday at a worksite in north Dickinson.

More: Visit The Press site for more photos of the exhumation site.

The body was “relatively intact” and found in the crouched upright position near an underground utility pipeline, according to a statement sent at 8:35 p.m. Friday, according to statements from Dickinson Police Capt. Joe Cianni.

“A positive identification of the body was not possible at the scene due to the extent of the decomposition of the body and the deterioration of the related clothing,” Cianni’s statement read. “Nothing unusual or suspicious was unearthed during the exhumation.”

Phoebe Stubblefield, the forensic science program director at the University of North Dakota in Grand Forks, supervised the exhumation. The body will be transported to UND for Stubblefield’s forensic medical examination.

Law enforcement agencies began investigating the construction site at the corner of 40th Street East and Fourth Avenue East before 7 a.m. Friday morning, according to reports, as police taped off the area and officers stood watch around the perimeter. The exhumation didn’t wrap up until 7:26 p.m., according to Cianni’s statement.

The remains were discovered near an industrial park and directly east of the Integrated Production Services and Halliburton campuses on 40th Street. The area is north of Lincoln Meadows Apartments.

Multiple calls and messages left for Cianni were not returned.

Continue reading “Remains of 'construction worker' found in north Dickinson”

Trinity teardown begins: Construction crews demolishing unusable east wing

A Veit Construction worker uses an excavator while tearing into Trinity High School’s east wing on Tuesday afternoon as part of demolition to remove the part of the building rendered unusable by the March 2014 fire. (Dustin Monke / The Dickinson Press)
A Veit Construction worker uses an excavator while tearing into Trinity High School’s east wing on Tuesday afternoon as part of demolition to remove the part of the building rendered unusable by the March 2014 fire. (Dustin Monke / The Dickinson Press)

Steel was ripped, bricks crumbled, dust flew and even chalkboards weren’t spared from the wrath of a construction excavator performing the final demolition project at Trinity High School on Tuesday afternoon.

“When I first came out here, I started crying,” said Dickinson Catholic Schools President Steve Glasser as he drove by to watch the demolition late in the afternoon. “It puts some closure to everything we’ve been through in the past 14 months. Now it’s real.”

Demolition of the structure began shortly after lunchtime, said Eugene Smith, project superintendent for JE Dunn Construction.

He said Veit Construction, which is a subcontractor on the job, began chipping away at the building and segregating iron, aluminum, sheet metal and concrete.

“They pull the concrete and recycle everything,” Smith said.

Continue reading “Trinity teardown begins: Construction crews demolishing unusable east wing”

Press named best small daily in North Dakota

The North Dakota Newspaper Association's General Excellence and Sweepstakes awards were given to The Dickinson Press on Friday night.
The North Dakota Newspaper Association’s General Excellence and Sweepstakes awards were given to The Dickinson Press on Friday night.

BISMARCK — The Dickinson Press was named the state’s best small daily newspaper during a ceremony Friday night at the Heritage Center.

The Press claimed the North Dakota Newspaper Association’s General Excellence and Sweepstakes awards for daily newspapers with a circulation of 12,000 or less — the highest honors given in the category. The newspaper also won the most individual first-place and total awards in both the editorial and advertising contents.

Press Publisher Harvey Brock said winning these honors “just reaffirms what I already know — that I’m privileged to work with a team of professionals who go about the business of putting out the best paper possible every day. We’re blessed to work for a company that gives us the training, resources and a culture to succeed. Congratulations to everyone.”

Managing Editor Dustin Monke won five first-place awards and reporter Andrew Brown won two in the editorial contest. Reporters Nadya Faulx, Bryan Horwath and Meaghan MacDonald, and Sports Editor Royal McGregor each claimed one first-place award.

“Our staff deserves all the credit for the awards they received,” Monke said. “They put in long hours — working nights and weekends — and tackled a variety of challenging stories in 2014. I’m proud of their efforts and am glad to see their hard work has been recognized.”

Advertising consultant David Hanson won two first-place honors in the advertising contest, while consultants Nikki Baer, Jenn Binstock, Sam Cunningham and Sonya Sacks each won one award in the advertising contest.

“Great advertising always sells advertising, and getting awards is always nice for the team. It validates that what they do is very, very important,” Press Advertising Director Bob Carruth said.

The General Excellence award factors in a newspaper’s reporting, editing, headlines, photography, design, advertising and production from three selected days. The judges commented on The Press’ “excellent news reporting, writing, editing.”

The Sweepstakes honor is given to the newspaper with the most awards in its circulation category, and is determined by a weighted point system. The Press won 20 first-place awards, 18 second places, 17 third places and eight honorable mentions across all categories.

Click below for a full list of award-winners.
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Wilson steps down as DHS boys basketball coach

Former Dickinson High boys basketball coach speaks to players in the huddle during a game in this undated Press file photo.
Former Dickinson High boys basketball coach speaks to players in the huddle during a game in this undated Press file photo.

John Wilson said the time is right to turn his focus away from coaching basketball.

Wilson stepped down as Dickinson High’s head boys basketball coach on Thursday after seven seasons, citing family and his health as the primary reasons for the decision.

He leaves the program with a 71-81 overall record.

“I just felt it was time for me and my family to take care of me,” he said.

Wilson endured his share of ups and downs as head coach.

Continue reading “Wilson steps down as DHS boys basketball coach”