B&A Global Energy sets sights on ending flaring in Bakken

Photo by Jonathan Pezza / Special to The Press Jack Kelley, president and CEO of B&A Global Energy of Tulsa, Okla., left, speaks with Michael Wu, inventor of the Energy Capturing Operating System (ECOS) at a well site in Mongolia in this undated photo provided by the company.
Photo by Jonathan Pezza / Special to The Press
Jack Kelley, president and CEO of B&A Global Energy of Tulsa, Okla., left, speaks with Michael Wu, inventor of the Energy Capturing Operating System (ECOS) at a well site in Mongolia in this undated photo provided by the company.

Jack Kelley and Skip Bennett are an unassuming duo with a big idea.

The entrepreneurs, together with a Taiwanese inventor and engineer, have a plan to capture natural gas, eliminate flaring at the wellhead, create a viable commodity from that gas, and pay both energy companies and royalty owners for their share.

B&A Global Energy, a small company based in Tulsa, Okla., has acquired the rights to the Energy Capturing Operating System (ECOS), a portable refinery able to be placed at a well site. The ECOS captures and processes methane gas produced in the hydraulic fracturing process into liquefied natural gas (LNG).

“This is a game-changing technology to the oil and gas business,” said Kelley, B&A Global’s president and CEO and a 25-year veteran of the energy industry who is also a retired U.S. Air Force pilot and a licensed architect.

B&A Global wants to bring its ECOS technology to the U.S. — specifically to North Dakota’s Bakken and Texas’ Eagle Ford shale formations — after witnessing the technology work in Asia.

“We have chosen the Bakken as our focus,” said Bennett, B&A Global’s board chairman and founder.

The idea, they say, is simple.

Turning off the lights and noise

B&A Global’s plan is to bring the portable refineries to well sites where natural gas is being flared. The ECOS unit captures methane gas released by the well, and then separates, compresses and refrigerates it to minus-261 degrees, converting the methane into LNG fuel without it ever leaving the well site. The process, B&A Global’s representatives say, eliminates the need to flare gas released in the drilling process.

LNG would be stored into specialized tank batteries and trucked away from the site in cryogenic tankers. When a well site is no longer flaring enough gas to be economically viable, the system can be moved — like an oil rig — to the next well pad.

Photo by Jonathan Pezza / Special to The Press Jack Kelley, president and CEO of B&A Global Energy of Tulsa, Okla., left, speaks with Michael Wu, inventor of the Energy Capturing Operating System (ECOS) at a well site in Mongolia in this undated photo provided by the company.
Photo by Jonathan Pezza / Special to The Press
Jack Kelley, president and CEO of B&A Global Energy of Tulsa, Okla., left, speaks with Michael Wu, inventor of the Energy Capturing Operating System (ECOS) at a well site in Mongolia in this undated photo provided by the company.

“Wherever an oil well can be drilled, ECOS can go,” said Michael Wu, a Taiwan-born inventor and entrepreneur, and engineer of the ECOS.

Kelley said the business plan calls for B&A Global to pay oil and gas companies market value for the natural gas captured, cut checks to mineral rights owners and sell LNG on the open market.

“This is a win-win situation for everybody,” Kelley said. “There cannot be anybody opposed to what we’re going to do.”

Kelley and Bennett came to North Dakota in January and spent more than a week driving throughout the Oil Patch in a rented Ford Explorer. During that stint, they said they spoke about the ECOS with anyone who would listen — including oilfield service company representatives, trucking companies and landowners.

Bennett, who spent more than two decades with IBM before moving into energy investment banking, recalled a conversation he had with a farmer near Keene, N.D., who told him he can hunt coyotes at night “by the light of the flares” that sound “like a jet engine.”

He said B&A Global wants to turn off the lights and the noise, and give mineral rights owners their share of a profit they believe is literally going up in flames.

They also stress the impact the ECOS would have on the environment by eliminating flared gas while creating a viable alternative fuel that is growing in popularity in foreign markets.

“The oil and gas operator that’s flaring wins because they get money for what they’re wasting, and the government wins,” Bennett said. “The environmental people are happy. The economic people are happy.”

 

LNG in North Dakota

Chad Wocken, the senior research manager at the University of North Dakota’s Energy and Environmental Research Center, said he is interested to learn more about B&A Global’s technology.

“I do think it has some merit and some capability, if it can be proven at the appropriate scale and conditions,” Wocken said.

However, he said the biggest hurdle with producing LNG in North Dakota is finding the market for it.

Wocken said the state has “very little LNG infrastructure,” meaning the product B&A Global hopes to produce would most likely need to be exported out of the state or country. He also questioned whether the cost of doing that, as well as the logistics involved with creating, shipping and marketing LNG, makes B&A Global’s process profitable.

“Anyone coming in with LNG technology, they’re going to have to bring some market to go with it,” Wocken said.

Kelley and Wu, who is also B&A Global’s senior vice president of technology, say the market for LNG already exists in Asia and pointed to its increasing use as fuel for semi trucks in the U.S. They also believe the creation of centralized LNG processing plants in North Dakota — such as Prairie Companies’ North Dakota LNG plant in Tioga, N.D. — proves the commodity is viable, while arguing their system is more economically feasible.

B&A Global’s long-term plans include creating LNG and compressed natural gas (CNG) pumping stations across the northern states. In an email to The Press, the company stated it has the rights to “conversion kit technology,” which converts diesel engines to LNG and gasoline engines to CNG.

One ECOS unit can process 10,000 gallons of LNG daily, according to the company. Kelley said hundreds of units can be set up. Pipeline infrastructure would be minimal and only needed if the ECOS was set up centrally to multiple wells, he said.

Because the ECOS is portable, Kelley said it can be taken to well sites that can’t be connected to gas-collecting pipeline systems.

“We’re doing the same thing they do at the large plants, but Michael has been able to scale everything down to be very efficient,” Kelley said.

As B&A Global takes its first steps into North Dakota’s natural gas market, Bennett said the company is in the early stages of negotiating partnerships with manufacturers and trucking companies throughout North Dakota and the Midwest for the transport of LNG, assembly and testing of the ECOS system, as well as its field operations.

The next big step, they said, is finding an oil company willing to work with them.

“We need to get the attention of an oil and gas operator that realizes there’s a solution to their flare gas,” Kelley said.

 

B&A Global Energy

What: Energy company with patent for Energy Capturing Operating System (ECOS), a small refinery that it says can turn natural gas into liquefied natural gas directly at well sites.

Who: Skip Bennett, founder and chairman; Jack Kelley, president and CEO; Michael Wu, senior vice president of technology.

Phone: 801-456-8565

Online: http://www.bandaglobalenergy.com

Author: Dustin Monke

Former newspaper editor. Now I market the best baked goods and donuts in America. But every once in a while, I write a cool story too.

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